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Abject

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EnglishModificar

EtymologyModificar

From Latin abiectus, past participle of abicere (to reject), formed from ab- + iacere (to throw).

PronunciationModificar

AdjectiveModificar

Abject (comparative Abjecter or more Abject, superlative Abjectest or most Abject)

Positive
Abject

Comparative
Abjecter or more Abject

Superlative
Abjectest or most Abject

  1. Sunk to a low condition; down in spirit or hope; degraded; servile; grovelling; despicable; as, abject posture, fortune, thoughts.
    "Base and abject flatterers." - Joseph Addison
    "An abject liar." - Thomas Babington Macaulay
    "And banish hence these abject, lowly dreams." - Shakespeare, Taming of the Shrew, I-ii
    "He sat obediently with that tentative and abject eagerness of a man who has but one pleasure left and whom the world can reach only through one sense, for he was both blind and deaf." - 1931 Faulkner, Sanctuary, ii
  2. (obsolete) Cast down; rejected; low-lying.
    "So thick bestrown abject and lost lay these, covering the flood." - John Milton

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounModificar

Singular
Abject

Plural
Abjects

Abject (plural Abjects)
  1. (obsolete) A person in the lowest and most despicable condition; a castaway.
    Shall these abjects, these victims, these outcasts, know any thing of pleasure?- Isaac Taylor
    We are the queen's abjects, and must obey. - W. Shakespeare [Richard III, Act I, Scene I]

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VerbModificar

Infinitive
to Abject

Third person singular
Abjects

Simple past
Abjected

Past participle
Abjected

Present participle
Abjecting

to Abject (third-person singular simple present Abjects, present participle Abjecting, simple past and past participle Abjected)
  1. (transitive) (obsolete) To cast off or down; hence, to abase; to degrade; to lower; to debase.

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ShorthandModificar

(Version: Simplified,Anniversary,Pre-Anniversary): a - b - j - k

FrenchModificar

PronunciationModificar

AdjectiveModificar

Abject m. (f. Abjecte, m. plural Abjects, f. plural Abjectes)

  1. (literary) Worthy of utmost contempt or disgust; vile; despicable.
  2. (literary, obsolete) Of the lowest social position.

Usage notesModificar

  • Abject lacks the idea of groveling, of moral degradation over time that is present in the English word.

Derived termsModificar

am:abject ar:abject de:abject et:abject el:abject es:abject fa:abject fr:abject ko:abject io:abject it:abject kn:abject hu:abject ml:abject my:abject nl:abject ja:abject pl:abject pt:abject ru:abject fi:abject ta:abject te:abject th:abject tr:abject uk:abject vi:abject zh:abject

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