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March

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EnglishModificar

PronunciationModificar

Etymology 1Modificar

Middle English marchen from Middle French marcher (to march, to walk), from Old French marchier (to stride, to march, to trample), of Patrono:Gem[[Category:Patrono:Gem derivations|March]] origin, from Patrono:Frk[[Category:Patrono:Frk derivations|March]] *markōn (to mark, mark out, to press with the foot), from Proto-Germanic *marko, from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (edge, boundary). Akin to Old English mearc, ġemearc "mark, boundary"

NounModificar

Singular
March

Plural
Marches

March (plural Marches)
  1. A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
  2. A political rally or parade
  3. Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see Wikipedia's article on this type of music)
  4. Steady forward movement or progression.
    The march of time.
  5. (obsolete) Smallage.
SynonymsModificar
Derived termsModificar
Related termsModificar
TranslationsModificar
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to March

Third person singular
marches

Simple past
marched

Past participle
marched

Present participle
marching

to March (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)
  1. To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
  2. To go to war; to make military advances.
Derived termsModificar
TranslationsModificar
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Modificar

From Middle English marche (tract of land along a country's border), from Old French marche (boundary, frontier), from Frankish *marka, from Proto-Germanic *marko, from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (edge, boundary).

NounModificar

Singular
March

Plural
Marches

March (plural Marches)
  1. (obsolete) A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book V:
      Therefore, sir, be my counsayle, rere up your lyege peple and sende kynges and dewkes to loke unto your marchis, and that the mountaynes of Almayne be myghtyly kepte.
  2. A region at a frontier governed by a marquess
SynonymsModificar
Derived termsModificar
Related termsModificar
TranslationsModificar
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbModificar

Infinitive
to March

Third person singular
marches

Simple past
marched

Past participle
marched

Present participle
marching

to March (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)
  1. (intransitive) To have common borders or frontiers
TranslationsModificar

AnagramsModificar

br:march et:march el:march es:march fa:march fr:march fy:march io:march it:march sw:march ku:march lo:march lt:march hu:march ml:march my:march nl:march ja:march km:march pl:march pt:march ru:march simple:march fi:march ta:march te:march tr:march vi:march zh:march

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